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Refubish A Wooden Porch Swing

My son found most of a wooden porch swing in an old building. All the parts were there. There were just worn out and/or rotten. The original material was redwood. That is a product that is not readily available in Tennessee where we live.

The back and arm rests were in good condition. So all it took was a little sanding to bring them back to life. The seat, however, needed to be rebuilt. We used pressure treated lumber to replace the seat area.

This is what we started with. Not too bad.

This is a piece of the redwood before sanding and after sanding.

This is a picture of the boards for the new curved seat.

Here the bottom seat ready to be attached to the rest of the swing.

The final woodon porch swing waiting for the Gorilla glue to dry so it can be hung.


The wooden porch swing is now hanging where it will receive a finish coat of either stain or paint to protect it from the weather.

The total cost for this project was less than $10.00. All of the original screws, nuts and bolts were in good condition and were reused. The materials that we used were two pressure treated 2x4s. One of the boards was 8 feet long and the other was 10 feet long.

The 8 foot board was used for the seat bottoms. We simply cut and sanded to follow the contour of the one good piece of wood. The 10 foot 2×4 was cut into two 5 foot long pieces and ripped on the table saw into 1 1/2 inch pieces by 3/4 inch wide by 5 feet long.

The other 5 footer was ripped long ways to get two pieces 3 1/2 inches wide by 3/4 inch thick. This was very close to the original configuration.

After the pieces were ripped (sliced long ways), they were run through the router to round off the corners. Everything was sanded to make it smooth. All it needs now is the finish coat.

Dave Altman